• aproposnix
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    208 months ago

    I’m originally from the US. Since living in Europe, I can’t believe how much easier the metric system is. I can not convert between the two so I dropped imperial. The only time I deal with it is when I call family in the states.

    I do recall, when I was a kid, they tried to convert the US to metric, but it failed miserably.

    • sibachian
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      78 months ago

      they didn’t really try. it’s more of a suggestion (and still is). metric is standard in the US within science, just not among regular folks because commercially it’s not as dramatic, i.e. news stations dramatize 100F!!! since it sounds way more dramatic than 38°C. if the news and commercial products started using metric, people would quickly switch over.

      unfortunately a lot of imperial shit has started migrating to europe due to chinese products being produced for the US market and then sold in europe as an afterthought using imperial units.

      • verysoft
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        58 months ago

        You already got me dying mentioning 38c. Its just a case of what you’ve grown up with. USA should defo swap, but they would have to display both for a long time for people to understand. If the weather and such started showing both and mentioning temps in both, then yeah it would probably take off.

      • ddh
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        8 months ago

        Holy smokes that’s over 300K!

      • Fu
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        08 months ago

        @sibachian and that’s better. You can easily tell, 100 is too hot to play outside, and 0 is too cold to play outside and everything else is fine.

          • VanillaGorilla
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            18 months ago

            I remember buying TVs in centimeters. It was a thing. Monitors have been imperial as long as I can remember, but TVs were metric. They only switched when they got bigger for whatever reason.

    • dedale
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      58 months ago

      Change is hard. In Europe we wanted to drop daylight saving time, but nobody could agree on which hour to keep. So it’s here to stay. Sigh.

        • AtomicPurple
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          18 months ago

          Actually no. This year was the last spring forward, at least for the US. We’re not falling back to standard time this year and never will again.

          • Kichae
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            48 months ago

            Leave it to the US to, in the choice between a “standard” thing and an off-standard thing to choose the off-standard option.

            • AtomicPurple
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              18 months ago

              lol

              In all seriousness, I’m actually very much in favor of keeping daylight savings time year round. I like having extra light in the evening and I don’t mind an extra hour of darkness each morning in the winter.

      • illi
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        18 months ago

        nobody could agree on which hour to keep. So it’s here to stay

        Is it really? I thought it was just postponed. Or do you say it juat because it seems to be always postponing

        • dedale
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          28 months ago

          Maybe I’m too pessimistic.
          The parliament voted to abolish them in 2019, but instead of agreeing on a specific time, or discussing it at the council level, they polled each country individually. We got incoherent results, obviously, and I don’t think any progress has been made since then.
          Admittedly they had bigger fish to fry, so maybe once the covid and the war are over, it’ll get sorted out.

      • Legisign
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        18 months ago

        THIS!!! Still angry about it. But it seems most of Europe would want permanent summer time, while Finland would rather use the actual correct solar time.

        Be that as it may, I’d rather swallow having to live in permanent summer time than go on changing my clocks twice a year.

    • sailsperson
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      28 months ago

      De-juro, US already uses metric - there’s samples and document and stuff like that, just like in other countries. This makes it even more peculiar, because it’s just the people that aren’t willing to drop some old system that they brought from the colonial British Empire with them back in the day; you’d think it only makes sense, with all the freedom and independence tendencies, but somehow the archaic measuring system from the monarch is still vigorously beloved and defended by millions… even though they’ve declared independence from the monarch a couple of centuries ago.

      We live in a weird world.

      • nafri
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        18 months ago

        they did not move entirely, they still use miles and such

        they are the imposter, deserve orange mark on the map LOL

    • RMiddleton
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      18 months ago

      I would love to see a campaign to convert the US to metric that focuses solely on comparison shopping at the grocery store! (It’s really difficult to do here with all our mismatched units of measurement.)

    • @WhiteBlackGoose
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      08 months ago

      Ik it exists on reddit, but it would be nice to not make it around Americans.

        • @WhiteBlackGoose
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          18 months ago

          Something around people, who think that what they’re used to is default everywhere

          • MentalEdge
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            08 months ago

            No. Just putting ! in front of a word does not create a link.

              • MentalEdge
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                18 months ago

                I hope we eventually get that feature over here then. I’m manually making links, and there is no way to link some things, from another instance, so you have to make do with links that take you off your own instance sometimes.

    • thehatfox
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      88 months ago

      Some older people in the UK still prefer Fahrenheit, Celsius is still the official/default unit however.

      A politician here recently tried to promote returning the UK to Imperial units, it has gone nowhere so far.

      • Sarsaparilla
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        78 months ago

        Yes, because the suggestion made everyone laugh hysterically, even here in Australia lol.

      • MuskX
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        48 months ago

        Are you serious? That’s pretty funny!

        • unsophisticated
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          -78 months ago

          It does seem superior for the weather and cooking.

          Having the weather between 50-100 instead of 10-40 kind of makes sense.

          And for the cooking, having the steak temperature at 130-135 or 135-145 is clearer than 54-57 or 57-63.

          Not that I’d think it would make sense to change, but it just seems plain stupid how we like to pretend the imperial system would be inferior and stupid.

          • BarqsHasBite
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            38 months ago

            Oh yeah that’s why it freezes at a random 32 degrees. I generally live between -30 C and +30 C.

      • Eavolution
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        18 months ago

        Was this the right honorable member for the 18th century perchance?

    • Affectadore
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      18 months ago

      Wow really? Cause you never really think of Liberia of having their shit together.

  • Cisop Sixpence
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    128 months ago

    I live in the United States and although I grew up here using Fahrenheit, I switched to Celsius almost 10 years ago. Part of my reason for switching was the rest of the world was using Celsius and every time they would mention the temperature, I had no clue if that was very hot, or just right and kept having to convert, so since there were not that many countries that used Fahrenheit, I switched. I still know what the comfortable range is in Fahrenheit, but now I also know in Celsius as I use it every day. Also, I no longer appear to be an old curmudgeon that is resistant to using a system the rest of the world already uses.

  • Don't Ask My Name
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    128 months ago

    Having the freezing point of water be at 0 instead of 32 just makes infinitely more sense.

    • @[email protected]
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      18 months ago

      Only if you’re measuring water temps. In general it makes more sense to put the zero of your scale at absolute zero

    • @[email protected]
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      -28 months ago

      Fahrenheit’s 0 is the freezing point of water - salt water that is. Not that I think it’s better, just that there was some thought put into it.

      • @[email protected]
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        28 months ago

        It… isn’t. That would change wildly depending on which sea/ocean you get your saltwater from (more salt = colder freezing point).

        It really is defined relative to a very specific brine mixture (in the most scientifically generous origin story - some say he literally just measured the coldest winter day he could). Well except it isn’t anyway, because like all US units nowadays it’s defined against metric units (namely the Kelvin, just like 0°C is actually defined to be 273.15 K).

  • roulettebreaker
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    8 months ago

    I had once heard described that fahrenheit’s best feature is that you can go “oh, 1-100, ‘sheesh, that’s really cold!’ to ‘hoof, that’s pretty hot!’” and yeah, while I was in the US where most temperatures (RIP Florida) change all the time, that sure was convenient.

    However, living in a country that always stays in the 80-100 range, the ‘oh fuck, the water’s freezingto 'oh fuck, the heat death of the sun is upon us’ range is a MUCH more useful scale to knowing if we’ve been struck by some sort of apocalyptic event today

  • CynAq
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    8 months ago

    As someone who moved to the US later in life, I learned to use fahrenheit because there’s no way to talk to anyone about the weather or cooking otherwise.

    If you need to do the same one day, don’t bother trying to convert in your head. Just learn the numbers conversationally. Familiarize yourself with how the weather feels with the number the weather app shows.

    I can’t convert at all but I can use both C and F in conversation because one rarely needs exact numbers anyway. You learn the ballparks pretty quick.

    • klz
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      8 months ago

      I find the conversion between the two easy enough to do it my head.

      This isn’t exact but is close enough for conversations and 99% of my needs.

      (Temp in F - 30) / 2

      Examples

      70F:
      70F - 30 = 40
      40 / 2 = 20C
      
      10F:
      10F - 30 = -20
      -20 / 2 = -10C
      
      

      The actual number is 21 / -12 but this is close enough for me 99.9% of the time

      • CynAq
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        18 months ago

        When you actually need to convert, sure. For conversation, try it my way. It’ll be noticeably more efficient.

    • 𝕊𝕚𝕤𝕪𝕡𝕙𝕖𝕒𝕟OP
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      38 months ago

      Thank you, this is a a great idea! I’ve found these common temperatures online, in case anyone wants to learn them:

      Description Celsius (°C) Fahrenheit (°F)
      Absolute Zero -273.15 -459.67
      Freezing Point of Water (at sea level) 0 32
      Average Room Temperature 20-22 68-72
      Body Temperature 37 98.6
      Average Summer Day 25-30 77-86
      Heat of a Desert 40-50 104-122
      Boiling Point of Water (at sea level) 100 212
      Highest Recorded Earth Temperature 56.7 134
      • jorge
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        28 months ago

        Average Summer Day 25-30 77-86

        See, that’s the problem with these “Fahrenheit is more intuitive” arguments. They are catered to a very specific country with a very specific climate. For me, 25-30 ºC is an average late spring day.

        • 𝕊𝕚𝕤𝕪𝕡𝕙𝕖𝕒𝕟OP
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          28 months ago

          It’s intuitive to those who grew up using it. For me, Celsius is much more intuitive because people around me used it all my life and refer to common temperatures in Celsius.

          So I think intuitiveness is very subjective and not a good criterion to judge a unit by.

    • @BravoVictor
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      28 months ago

      Terrific insight. I had often wondered if that alone would assist with adoption if it became standard in the US. That, or we would just print it in two formats all the time…

    • RMiddleton
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      28 months ago

      This, for sure. I live in the US and wanted to learn to understand Celsius so I switched my phone to use it. Internalizing a system works where translating/converting does not. I quickly learned that I feel comfortable in temperatures in the 20s. Since I feel comfortable in Fahrenheit temps in the upper 60s to mid 70s I can guess what the conversion is for most temps, but I don’t have to do it to understand that I like how 22 C feels.

      Similarly, if you’re traveling and having to use a foreign currency I prefer to establish an idea in my head of cheap, reasonable, expensive than stopping to convert every price exactly. A “reasonable price” is relative to the item and location, of course, and should also affect my perspective.

      Absorbing a new system by this method works fairly easily for temperatures and money, but less so for other measurements. I don’t have as fine-tuned a sense of what ounces, pounds, or grams feel like as I do units of temperature. And I am always adding or subtracting 12 to understand time when expressed as 13h and up.

      During the brief period when the US was encouraging metric system understanding there were many highway speed limit signs expressed as 55 mph / 88 kph. Every time I need to make that conversion I think of 5/8 because of that sign. And I usually just make guesstimates that work well enough.

      I like learning new things. The generation before me in my family turned off their brains long ago and now suffer dementia. I work to keep my mind active. Learning other units of measure is one example.

      Finally I’ll say that I WISH I could get to a point of understanding languages this way without translation.

      • CynAq
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        8 months ago

        Sadly, language is a bit iffy when it comes to internalizing.

        Unless you learn a language when you’re a child, and ideally starting before you’re ten, you won’t get instinctive enough to match a native speaker’s. That’s just how our brain development works.

        There’s a special linguistic plasticity which is the language learning instinct that’s fully active until we’re ten or so and gradually declines and pretty much stops when we’re in our early twenties.

        What you learn until then is used by the language centers of your brain and is more or less reflexive. You don’t need to think about it to use it, like walking.

        After that, we can only learn languages intellectuality, which means we do have to think about it and deliberately listen and speak (or read and write obviously) using our prefrontal cortex.

        Maybe one day we’ll invent a technology or some medical treatment to turn it back on in later life.

    • ThesePaycheckAvenging
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      18 months ago

      Isn’t Fahrenheit a “feel” temperature unit anyway? Once you need precision (science), even Americans switch to Celsius/Kelvin.

      • @[email protected]
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        8 months ago

        FWIW Fahrenheit has more precision for the temperatures you most commonly feel. Day-to-day you’re likely to feel temps between 10-32°C (range of 22°), which is 50-90°F (range of 40°). It might not seem like a big deal, but I can tell a difference in my house when setting my thermostat from 68°F to 69°F; conversely, if I turn my thermostat to C mode both values get rounded to 20.

        But yes, as an American, I think of CPU temps in terms of C, I know water freezes at 0°C/32°F, I know water boils at 100°C but have never committed to memory what it is in F, and in chem classes we always use C/K.

        • ddh
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          8 months ago

          Can you set your thermostat to 68.5°F? I can set mine to 21.5°C, does that mean I have more precision? This precision argument is nonsense.

    • @[email protected]
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      08 months ago

      I totally agree. I tried to switch to Celsius before I left to study abroad in college but it was very stressful. It was much easier when I was actually there and everyone used the same units.

  • @[email protected]
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    28 months ago

    F is kinda nice for weather as a scale of 1 to 100 of really cold feeling to really hot feeling. But for anything scientific or calibration related, C is great

    • @[email protected]
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      38 months ago

      Disagree. Celsius is super helpful for determining if it’s gonna snow or not, a key weather thing where I live. Humid and cold and below 0? Snow. Humid and cold and above 0? Rain or freezing rain.

      Also helps with plants. Below 0? Frost.

      I’d argue you can’t get more intuitive than 0 is cold, below 0 is very cold. Celsius also plays nice with round numbers, every 5 or 10 degrees is a change in feeling. 0 is cold, 5 out is cooler, 10 out is cool, 15 is moderate, 20 is comfortable, 25 is room and warm, 30 is hot, 35+ is very hot. Every ten degrees we’re doing big changes. 0 is frozen, 10 is cool, 20 is comfortable, 30 is hot. 32 being frozen doesn’t feel as intuitive.

  • moneygrowsontrees
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    8 months ago

    I like to refer to them as Freedom units and Communist units (in jest, obviously). I will say, though, that Fahrenheit feels like a more precise scale for measuring temperature even if the units are goofy.

    • VanillaGorilla
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      88 months ago

      I don’t get the precision argument. It really doesn’t matter for personal use because you wouldn’t feel the difference anyways and if you really needed it to be as precise as possible (for… I don’t know, science) you’d use decimals. And if you’re sciencing, you’d use the system that allows easy conversion, which is metric.

      • ddh
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        28 months ago

        I’m scared to ask now if Fahrenheit has decimals or if it’s like 74 and one eighth degrees.

      • moneygrowsontrees
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        18 months ago

        I think I came across as saying something different than I intended. I wasn’t arguing that Fahrenheit IS more precise. I was saying it feels more precise.

        If I’m measuring a length, then metric feels more precise. I can measure 1035mm in a nice, whole, number while 40.74803 inches is a length I can’t measure well with a measuring tape and I’d probably end up calling it 40.75" which, even then, still isn’t a whole number. I’m just talking about the perception, not the actual useful nature.

        • VanillaGorilla
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          8 months ago

          I get what you’re saying. It just doesn’t make sense to me. But that’s because I’m accustomed to metric.

      • Double_A
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        18 months ago

        The worst thing about imperial is that it’s not very consistent within itself. E.g. imagine that you need 100 pieces of wood, which are each 2.5 inch long. How do you quickly calculate how much wood you need to buy so you can cut it up? Do you just not think in units of 10 and 100s, but something else instead?

    • @[email protected]
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      38 months ago

      What additional arguments besides personal experience would you give to back this precision claim?

      Temperature scales are arbitrary by nature, and the criteria behind their definition can be useful or not. Fahrenheit’s isn’t that much useful compared to Celsius’ or Kelvin’s.

      • moneygrowsontrees
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        -18 months ago

        I’m not arguing on Fahrenheit’s behalf or saying it IS more precise. I just said it “feels” more precise because you have finer increments in whole numbers. 70 degrees F is about 21 degrees C while 90 degrees F is about 32 degrees. 20 degrees of increment in F versus 12 in C which feels more precise. It’s the same way metric length measurements feel more precise because there are whole number millimeters rather than fractional inches.

        I have no strong opinion any one way, other than I feel like everyone should endeavor to be comfortable converting between various systems of measurement.

        • Virkkunen
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          78 months ago

          You can simply use as many decimals you want to make Celsius more precise. You don’t see it used in general because it really isn’t needed.

          • ddh
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            38 months ago

            The little digital thermometers I have around the house read to one decimal place. The precision argument is just bizarre.

    • BarqsHasBite
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      28 months ago

      So precise that everything is rounded to the nearest 5 or 10 degrees lol.